No Context in Retrospect.

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It’s been three weeks since No Context ended. In case you missed it, No Context was my 400 day long project that consisted of a thirty second video every single day. In the real world that means that for over a year I looked at the world almost exclusively as something to film, edit and publish. The project spanned a house move, a university change, two stolen phones, two film festivals, three editing programs, at least five cameras (mainly due to previously stated phone theft) and a good number of important personal developments. In other terms, I started this project in a pre-Brexit, pre-Trump world.

I want to take this moment to thank the people around me who put up with incessant filming for all this time, and the people who watched the videos regularly (I noticed and appreciated it, honest) but especially to the people I’ve met since I started and who have never known me without a camera in hand and a twenty-four-hour deadline to meet. I promise that it won’t always be the case but you have been very patient. There’s also about ten people that made it into more than twenty videos each. I commend you.

What’s happened in the last three weeks has been a strangely liberating process. The sun has set twenty one times in streaks of lovely colour and I have not filmed it once. Nights in with my friends watching dvds and debating the merits of social action or standing on a balcony in a heatwave, as well as nights out with my friends playing music in bars have passed by calmly and not been turned into frenetic montages. I’ve been in good moods and bad moods and turned none of them into aesthetic, and before I decided to write this sentence the only people who knew about my new tattoo were those who’d seen it person. I’ve been able to go to bed without touching editing software and not be wracked with guilt. I’ve also had the time to develop and film more complete, longer projects, which has been something I’ve had to patiently wait for until this point and am hugely enjoying.

I do, however, somewhat miss the urgency and purpose that this gave every single day. Yes it was difficult to find things and time to film during exam weeks and when I wasn’t doing anything dynamic, but the challenge was part of the fun. Looking back at the project I barely recognize the style or content of the first hundred or so videos, they already feel like a drastically different person filmed them. I’m sure that in time this same veil will descend over the most recent videos, the last two or three months that almost feel like I’m still living them when I watch them back. All in all, I think it’s good to no longer have this way to spy on my past self or to have to produce and publicise my day-to-day existence anymore. I think I deeply underestimated the time this project would take and the effect it would have on how I live and experience my own life. I just jumped in with all the naivety I could muster (not much) and while I don’t think I’d do it again, I’m glad I saw it through to the end.

This is the final chapter of No Context, but not the last of the project.

 

No Context in retrospect | What I’ve learned from 100 days of videos.

 

If you’ve landed here from my facebook (hello) you’ve probably seen or heard about my project No Context. If not, No Context is the ongoing project where I film, edit and post online 30 seconds of my life every single day. Yesterday, the 9th August I posted my 100th video in this series and I want to share some of the things I’ve learned in starting this and seeing it through up to now.

The first thing to know is that this project came from a place where I felt I didn’t have the skills to use my equipment. I had changed cameras in December and still felt, four months later, that I did not know how to use it. This was compounded by having to change editing software since Final Cut 7 finally became incompatible with my OS in January. (Just let that sink in: I was using software released in 2009 in 2016). One of my primary goals was therefore to learn to use my camera and find what editing software suited me – and I did! After a dalliance with Premiere Pro (CS5 in case anyone’s curious) I settled into a regular rhythm of using Final Cut X for editing then colour grading in Da Vinci Resolve. I’d say over 60 of the 100 videos so far were created in that workflow but I recently got the hang of the (highly unintuitive at first) colour correction capabilities of Final Cut X. I remember the days when I swore blind I would never use Final Cut X. I now use it literally every day. All it took was some patience.

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(RIP FCP7)

A difficult thing about this project is that, although it’s only 30 seconds a day, there are days when even that seems too much. One rule I set myself is to not use footage filmed for another purpose in No Context. Mainly this avoids running into any issues where organisations who I have worked with could claim I used footage produced for them but it’s also a good personal integrity failsafe. I never feel like I can just cheat a day and re-use some footage. The effect of this has been that there have been days where I have been solidly filming for hours on end but struggled to film No Context. The other occasions when this project seems huge is when life simply gets too much. This happens rarely but every so often I will have to make what feels like a monumental effort to produce something whereas the day after I could be sorting through three possible edits of a day. Life isn’t equally spread out but part of the fun is seeing through the ups and downs and watching the periods of rush and calm that come out in the project as a whole.

But these are technical goals and challenges. More than anything this project is about creating something and sharing something of myself and my life. That’s been beyond eye-opening. These last 100 days have been divided between three primary locations, spent with a huge variety of people and included one of the happiest weeks of my life, as well as a very difficult moment that I had to deal with. The videos that mean the most to me are often those that others find impenetrable or simply boring. On the other hand a video that took hours to edit and never seemed right at any point thanks to footage I didn’t like or a day when I felt like I had nothing to film have often been the videos that had the best reactions. It’s endlessly mysterious to me but I guess it’s in the nature of the project that it varies between pure aesthetic and more personality or story driven extracts.

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Case in point: one of my favourite days

People have told me they find the project voyeuristic, others have said it’s calming. I’m still not sure what it is yet but I’m sure I still have more to learn just from making sure I am creative and aware of my surroundings every day.

I said this in one of the videos and it was the idea that pushed me into this project so I leave you with the thought:

If I don’t spend 30 seconds of any given day in front of something beautiful or worth recording I should change what I’m doing with my days.

See the project from the start in the playlist below and subscribe to the channel if you want to see more. I’m still going.